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You can blog from Windows Live writer! August 29, 2010

Posted by Anand Mallaya in computers, internet.
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This is actually a test as well as info. You can now blog from Windows Live Writer, a blogging platform for Windows. You can save locally,  can post to most of the popular blogging platform with xmlrpc support post draft to blog etc. One draw back I figured out is that it can not download wordpress free account theme. So you can’t see how your post actually looks in the blog while offline.

Some good editing features are : inserting table, map etc.

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Videos on Semantic Web and Linked data July 25, 2010

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TED talks – Tim Berners Lee On the Next Web

TED -Talks – Tim Berners-Lee: The year open data went worldwide

TED Talks – Hans Rosling on HIV: New facts and stunning data visuals – A use-case of Linkeddata

Tim Berners lee talking about at Gov 2.0 Expo 2010

The Semantic Web of Data Tim Berners-Lee

practical semantic web – creating a catalog of Linked data April 4, 2010

Posted by Anand Mallaya in computers, internet, technology, tutorial, web.
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Today I am going to work on creating a semantic web document. I am going to make a catalog of linked data datasets listed under linkeddata.org. Here is the list I am going to publish in RDF.

  1. choose the correct vocabulary – there are different generic vocabularies like Dublin Core, FOAF etc and specialized vocabulary like Dcat, Void etc. for creating catalogs. Dcat is designed for government data catalogs, so I choose VoID vocabulary, which is designed for single dataset provider. It uses generic vocabularies lke FOAF and DC as well.
  2. Select suitable tools – Tools to edit the RDF document. There are plenty of them ,in this case and RDF editor, like the Rhodonite tool for RDF editing and browsing. But I couldn’t understand it well because of poor documentation and help. So I chose an online VoID editor from DERI Galway. Though the result is in Turtle format, there are tools to convert turtle document to RDF/XML format. Like this one online : RDF Validator/converter rdfabout.com
  3. Creating the semantic grpah – first I am going to choose a dataset and add it to my catalog. To start with, I chose CrunchBase entry listed in linkeddata.org.  Go to VoID editor and add the following details in it
  4. Dataset URI:  http://cb.semsol.org/

    Dataset Homepage URIhttp://cb.semsol.org/

    Dataset Name:  Crunchbase

    Dataset Description:  RDFized Crunchbase entries

    Example Resource:  http://cb.semsol.org/company/yahoo

    Dataset Topic : business, database

    Vocabulary URIhttp://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns# , http://www.w3.org/2003/01/geo/wgs84_pos#,  http://cb.semsol.org/ns#

    Publisherhttp://semsol.com

    SPARQL endpoint : http://cb.semsol.org/sparql

    Now the dataset entry for cruchbase dataset is ready in VoID vocabulary, in the right side textarea. It is in Turtle notation.

    @prefix dcterms: <http://purl.org/dc/terms/&gt; .
    @prefix void: <http://rdfs.org/ns/void#&gt; .
    @prefix : <#> .
    ## your dataset
    <http://cb.semsol.org/&gt; rdf:type void:Dataset ;
    foaf:homepage <http://cb.semsol.org/&gt; ;
    dcterms:title “Crunchbase” ;
    dcterms:description “RDFized Crunchbase entries” ;
    dcterms:publisher <http://semsol.com&gt; ;
    void:sparqlEndpoint <http://cb.semsol.org/sparql&gt; ;
    void:vocabulary <http://cb.semsol.org/ns#&gt; ;
    void:exampleResource <http://cb.semsol.org/company/yahoo&gt; ;

    @prefix rdf: <http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#&gt; .@prefix rdfs: <http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#&gt; .@prefix foaf: <http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/&gt; .@prefix dcterms: <http://purl.org/dc/terms/&gt; .@prefix void: <http://rdfs.org/ns/void#&gt; .@prefix : <#> .
    ## your dataset<http://cb.semsol.org/&gt; rdf:type void:Dataset ; foaf:homepage <http://cb.semsol.org/&gt; ; dcterms:title “Crunchbase” ; dcterms:description “RDFized Crunchbase entries” ; dcterms:publisher <http://semsol.com&gt; ; void:sparqlEndpoint <http://cb.semsol.org/sparql&gt; ; void:vocabulary <http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#&gt; ; void:vocabulary <http://www.w3.org/2003/01/geo/wgs84_pos#&gt; ; void:vocabulary <http://cb.semsol.org/ns#&gt; ; void:exampleResource <http://cb.semsol.org/company/yahoo&gt; ; dcterms:subject <http://dbpedia.org/resource/Database&gt; ; dcterms:subject <http://dbpedia.org/resource/Business&gt; .

  5. Convert in to RDF/XML file(serialize) – copy the dataset details in turtle notation and go to RDF/XML converter tool. And paste the turtle notated content there and select input format as N-Triples/Turtle, and click validate. The result is given below.
  6. <?xml version=”1.0″?>
    <rdf:RDF xmlns:foaf=”http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/&#8221; xmlns:void=”http://rdfs.org/ns/void#&#8221;
    xmlns:rdf=”http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#&#8221;
    xmlns:dcterms=”http://purl.org/dc/terms/”&gt;
    <void:Dataset rdf:about=”http://cb.semsol.org/”&gt;
    <foaf:homepage rdf:resource=”http://cb.semsol.org/&#8221; />
    <dcterms:title>Crunchbase</dcterms:title>
    <dcterms:description>RDFized Crunchbase entries</dcterms:description>
    <dcterms:publisher rdf:resource=”http://semsol.com&#8221; />
    <void:sparqlEndpoint rdf:resource=”http://cb.semsol.org/sparql&#8221; />
    <void:vocabulary rdf:resource=”http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#&#8221; />
    <void:vocabulary rdf:resource=”http://www.w3.org/2003/01/geo/wgs84_pos#&#8221; />
    <void:vocabulary rdf:resource=”http://cb.semsol.org/ns#&#8221; />
    <void:exampleResource rdf:resource=”http://cb.semsol.org/company/yahoo&#8221; />
    <dcterms:subject rdf:resource=”http://dbpedia.org/resource/Database&#8221; />
    <dcterms:subject rdf:resource=”http://dbpedia.org/resource/Business&#8221; />
    </void:Dataset>
    </rdf:RDF>

  7. Now repeat the above process and create entries for all the datasets listed in the Linkeddata.org.
  8. Combine the RDF entries in to a single file, no need to copy all the tags but starting from <void:Dataset .. >only
    something like
    <?xml version=”1.0″?>
    <rdf:RDF xmlns:foaf=”http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/&#8221; xmlns:void=”http://rdfs.org/ns/void#&#8221;
    xmlns:rdf=”http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#&#8221;
    xmlns:dcterms=”http://purl.org/dc/terms/”&gt;
    <void:Dataset rdf:about=”http://cb.semsol.org/”&gt;


    </void:Dataset>
    <void:Dataset rdf:about=”http://dbpedia.org/”&gt;
    ….
    ….
    <void:Dataset>
    <void:Dataset rdf:about=”http://www.geonames.org/”&gt;


    <void:Dataset>
    </rdf:RDF>
  9. And the catalog is ready in RDF/XML with all the datasets added. Save it as a file with extension .rdf like Linked_data_catalog.rdf.  Now the machine can understand (if programmed wisely) to some extend what data are available there to convert in to meaningful information and then to  knowledge.
    You can find the catalog here: Linkeddata datasets catalog(note: not yet ready, comeback later )

Semantic Web bookmarks collection December 11, 2009

Posted by Anand Mallaya in internet, web.
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Semantic Web

Twine – Organize, Share, Discover Information Around Your Interests | Twine
W3C Semantic Web Section
jaanix – tune the web
microformats.org
SemanticHacker
wiki.dbpedia.org : About
JavaScript Visual Wordnet
Distributed Object Computing Research Group Overview
SenseBot – semantic search engine that finds sense on the Web
Cognition :: Giving Technologies New Meaning
ProgrammableWeb – Mashups, APIs, and the Web as Platform
Planning a Semantic Web site
SPARQL Calendar Demo: Step-by-step Example – TechnicaLee Speaking
The Twitter Times: semanticwebnews

Data sources

Data Sets | Linked Data – Connect Distributed Data across the Web

The Map of Data – Sindice
Some Datasets Available on the Web » Data Wrangling Blog
Dapper: The Data Mapper
GeoWordNet

Articles

Why RDFa is the only Web scaleable metadata format for next-generation search engines
Semantic Web set for critical mass | Applications – InfoWorld
The Semantic Web in Action – Scientific American – December 2007
SitePoint » Obama’s Groundbreaking use of the Semantic Web
Cultivate Interactive Issue 7: Challenges for a Semantic Web
The original proposal of the WWW, HTMLized
The Semantic Web: opportunities and challenges for next-generation Web applications
4 New APIs: US Congress, Semantic Search, Fashion Search Engine, Read-Write Mapping
Tim Berners-Lee and the Semantic Web, Linked Data, RDF and a Worldwide Database « ResourceShelf
Official Google Blog: World Bank public data, now in search
When Linked Data Rules Fail at Frederick Giasson’s Weblog
The new smarter web – The Irish Times – Fri, Dec 04, 2009

Tools

Magpie – a tool for Semantic Web
Flex SPARQL Query Viewer
Create – Dorthy.com Alpha
HitCompanies | Find companies and export lists for free – Search Results
IYOUIT Portal – Share Life Blog Play
DailyPerfect, predictively personalized news, behavioral targeting technology
SearchMonkey – YDN
SemanticProxy
QDOS – measure your internet status
Visual Modeling Forum – Visual OWL
WikiProfessional Concept Web
Welcome to the Mulgara Project!
Neverspace : Main
WebProtégé
OpenLink Data Explorer
OpenLink iSPARQL
Sindice data inspector

Tutorials

SPARQL

SPARQL By Example
OpenLink AJAX Toolkit (OAT) Wiki : Interactive Sparql Query Builder Basic Tutorial
SPARQL tutorial
The Semantic Web and Challenges – Slide list
Tutorial on OWL
Semantic Puzzle
Web3.0

Companies

TopQuadrant
Asemantics
Zitgist – Quality Linked Data Products and Services
semsol – semantic web solutions
TriviumRLG LLC | Strategic Development of Information Assets
Talis
The Semantic Puzzle | Open World Assumptions
Ontotext – Semantic Technology Developer
Semantic Technologies Center
FrontPage – The Open Knowledge Foundation

Sites

Home | OpenCalais
TaskForces/CommunityProjects/LinkingOpenData/SemWebClients – ESW Wiki
The Transducer
Tom Heath – Home
Semantic Agent – Programming Multi Agent Systems in SWRL
ebSemantics – enabling Semantic Web based E-Commerce
8th International Semantic Web Conference (ISWC 2009)
Seminal resources on general semantics and ontologies ? – Semantic Overflow
Semantic Overflow
The Cambridge Semantic Web Meetup Group (Cambridge, MA) – Meetup.com
Tones – Home
Bluereek
BBC – Music – Home
backstage.bbc.co.uk :: Front Page :: |BBC’s developer network to encourage innovation and support new talent
Events/BONyConference – STLab
Linked Open Data Around-The-Clock
CKAN – Comprehensive Knowledge Archive Network
SchemaWeb – RDF schema directory
Linkeddata research centre at DERI
Factual
New York Times
Ordnance Survey – UK
Headup
Linked data at Guardian

A for Amazon, B for Best buy – A to Z for Google, Wikipedia, Yahoo and Bing October 18, 2009

Posted by Anand Mallaya in internet, web.
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Internet have changed our lives for sure. We learned A for Apple when we were kids. And in Google age it all changed. Let us look at how different they are from the ideal ‘A for Apple’ construct. These are from the first entry of auto search assist suggestions from top search engines.

According to Google.com

A for Amazon

B for best buy

C for Craigslist

D for dictionary

E for ebay

F for Facebook

G for Gmail

H for Hotmail

I for IMDB

J for Jet blue

K for Kohls

L for lowes

M for mapquest

N for Netflix

O for Old Navy

P for Pandora

Q for quotes

R for realtor.com

S for southwest airlines

T for target

U for Usps

V for Verizon wireless

W for Walmart

X for Xm radio

Y for youtube

Z for zillow

According to Yahoo.com

A for Amazon

B for best buy

C for Craigslist

D for dictionary

E for ebay

F for Facebook

G for Google

H for Hotmail

I for Ikea

J for Jobs

K for Kmart

L for lyrics

M for myspace

N for Netflix

O for Orbitz

P for People search

Q for qvc

R for recipes

S for southwest airlines

T for target

U for Ups

V for Verizon wireless

W for Weather

X for Xbox 360

Y for youtube

Z for zip codes

According to Wikipedia

A for Animal

B for Brazil

C for Canada

D for Department of France

E for England

H for Hispanic (U.S. Census)

I for India

J for Japan

K for Km²(square kilometer)

L for List of sovereign states

M for marriage

N Native American(U.S. Sensus)

O for Ontario

P for Poland

Q for quebec

R for Race and ethnicity in the United States Census

S for spain

T for the Newyork Times

U for United States

V for village

W for World War II

X for Xbox 360

Y for Yale University

Z for Zip code

According to Bing

A for AOL

B for Bank of America

C for Craigslist

D for dictionary

E for ebay

F for facebook

G for Google

H for Hotmail

I for irs

J for jcpenney

K for kohls

L for lowes

M for myspace

N for netflix

O for office depot

P for pogo

Q for qvc

R for runescape

S for sears

T for target

U for USPS

V for verizon

W for yahoo.com (weird)

X for XM radio

Y for yahoo

Z for zip codes

140 character Twitter mystery – the answer October 12, 2009

Posted by Anand Mallaya in internet, social media, technology, web.
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In the previous post we have looked at anatomy of a tweet to find answers to the 140 character mystery. It quite nagged me for a while. My geek mind was losing to find an explanation. Today I found a solution. It has nothing to do with the twitter protocols probably, but some thing simpler. Twitter was created with a goal of a simple interface for near-real time communication. With a ubiquitous access to the service.

They gave all kind of user interfaces, like a web based one for web browser users,  APIs for web application developers- so that developers can create applications easily, and for mobile phones through text messages.

Guess what? Now you may have got a clue.

The text message or SMS was a protocol initially designed to optimally use the telephony based GSM mobile technology. The key idea for SMS was to use this telephony-optimized system and to transport messages on the signaling paths needed to control the telephony traffic during time periods when no signaling traffic existed. The message length was limited by the signalling protocol used at that time. Initially it was 128 bytes and later changed to 140 bytes length.

Now Twitters’ designers may have also targetted text message users, the most widely used data application on the planet.

SMS user stats

SMS user stats

Hence my answer.

To find the real answer we need to contact Twitter engineers..

Phew I will get a good sleep today :p

Anatomy of a tweet – 140 character mystery August 15, 2009

Posted by Anand Mallaya in computers, internet, social media, technology.
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Everybody tweets now-a-days. Even cats tweet(@sockongton). A tweet is a burst of 140 characters from all those interesting ‘characters’ around the globe, describing ‘what they are are doing’. I wonder why just 140 characters. why not 130 or 150. So I started digging and the search lead me to check the technical anatomy of a tweet. And it gave some interesting facts about twitter. I will put the tweet anatomy examination report.

  • Number of charactr in a tweet is 140
  • Total content length(XHR request) when a tweet is 140 exactly(maximum length) – 262
  • Minimum content length(XHR request) when a tweet is one char long – 107
  • Meaning XHR header content length is 106 byte- a constant

So I checked for an answer with twitter API response

We can check a users’ status using User/show APIhttp://twitter.com/users/show.xml?screen_name=anandcv

The response is an xml file( given below is the response of my user id @anandcv when my last tweet was 140 char long)

Twitter user/show API respone

Twitter user/show API respone

Ther response got an interesting field in the status – <truncated>false</truncated>.

Probably a remainder of early implementation, which allowed more than 140 characters. Currently twitter web interface allows only 140 chars.

The other fields are

<created_at></created_at> – the time stamp
<id></id>  – the unique message id
<text></text> – the tweet itself
<source></source> – source of the tweet (from web or other tools etc..)
<in_reply_to_status_id/> – Replying to some tweet?
<in_reply_to_user_id/> –  Replying to somebody user id?
<favorited>false</favorited> – favorited?
<in_reply_to_screen_name/> – screen name of the user.

No clues yet. The search continues…

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Twitter – the dawn of the real-time web July 5, 2009

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Twitter.com is omnipresent in the web.  Since its inception in 2006, in a short time span Twitter has grown to such a magnitude that Google got scared. The reason – collaboration and real-time. The incredible combination resulted in phenomenal popularity. The service is very simple and useful and  became omnipresent in the web.

image source:  Google trends

If  google discovered the power of data, Twitter discovered the real-time. In this fast world real-time means a lot. And data is powered by the evergrowing crowds. The API(Application Programming Interface) supported by twitter offered the data open to the technical community. And that proved just right thing to do. The data was used in a very creative ways.

From stock trading (Stocktwits) and real estate(TweetLister) to diet and exercise(Twackit), twitter found a long list of applications.

And twitter is attracting a large number of famous people from celebrities, writers and millionaires to politicians and leaders, all finds time to tweet.

Let us wait and see what wonders Twitter will bring in forecoming days.

Creating standalone desktop web applictions December 17, 2008

Posted by Anand Mallaya in computers, internet, technology, web.
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This is the age of bowser based web applications. Browser like google Chrome provides a way to create webb application shortcuts to your desk top with out loading the actual browser. The interface will let you open an exclusive browser window only for your favourite application like Gmail or Facebook. No adress bars, no menus just your app. Cool eh!? Here are some tricks that will allow you to ceate standalone web applications. Sometimes these are called Rich Internet Applications or RIA 1. Firefox The feature is not built in, however there are add-ons avialable which will let you do the job.Prism is such an application. Prism allows you to run web applications (like Gmail or Facebook, for example) in a single browser window, separate from your main Firefox application. Prism is a standalone application. Now a firefox extension named Refractor is available, which does the function directly from Firefox. After installing the refractor add-on you can create applications right from ther firefox while you browse. An article on the Wired magazine:click here 2. Gogle Chrome. Google Chrome has this feature built in. You can make any webpage a desktop application by clicking on the ‘create application’ button. The standalone blogger application looks like this 3. Adobe Air Adobe AIR is used to make completely independent desktop web applications with out needing any web browser.Though this is not for novice users, it is aa good tools for web developers. Using Adobe AIR standalone desktop web applications can be developed. You need to install a AIR runtime on your operating system. Click here for Adobe AIR page You can get lot of applications by googling. Here are some popular links: http://www.adobe.com/products/air/showcase/ http://www.sizlopedia.com/2008/03/08/10-most-useful-adobe-air-applications/ http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/some_adobe_air_apps_worth_a_look.php 4. Google gears Google gears is a software which enables offline functionality to web application.Once offline, Gears saves all work on local database on your computer, you can still work with out internet connection. The next time when you gets the connection, Gears syncs the changes to the server. This combined with the desktop app featrures, is creating the ways to the RIA (Rich Internet Applicaation}.

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10 google services that are less popular December 11, 2008

Posted by Anand Mallaya in internet, technology, web.
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Though Google is ubiquitous in the internet, many of the services provided by Google are not well known to the public. These are very useful free tools you can use for from website promotion to day to day uses.

1. Google Sites
Category: Publishing
This service is a free hosting medium, that you can use to make website. The site is hosted at google’s server. Formerly it was Jotspot. The company was aquired by google. Sites can be built with ease using simple and efficient user interface.

2. Google Trends
Category: Statistics
Trends service allows you to find popularity of keywords over time. You can compare two or more keywords to know relative popularity. It provides a list of top 100 keywords on a hourly basis(hottrends). this is very useful for website promotions and marketing.

3. Google Suggest
Category: Search
Google suggest recommends in real time as you type on the searchbar. This note only saves the typing time but also helps discover useful information as you type that otherwise may have missed.

4. Google Adurl
Category: Advertising /publishing
This is a feature that allows you to add a site or page to the google search index. This is useful for web administrators and bloggers.

5. Google Mashup Editor
Category: Publishing
This application is rarely known to the public. The application allows to create useful applications using simple syntaxes. The applications can access,process and display data in a meaningful way. Useful for content providers.

6. Google SMS
Category: Mobile/Search
This is particularly for mobile applications. It allows to querry google using mobile devices.

7. Google Reader
Category: News/Aggregation
This service allows to get news and updates from many sites in one place. This is done using RSS feeds from the websites.

8. Google Talk Gadget
Category: Communication
This is a less known application. It allows users to use google talk without installing anything on your computer. Truly portable.

9. Google Sets
Category: Search
This service allows the user to generate a list from one or more keywords. Sets automatically categories the keywords and generates similar keywords. This service is very useful for web administrators in SEO(search engine optimization).

10. Google Notebook
Category: Utility
Google notebook is a utility that allows to create,edit and save small notes online.
This will be useful while researching the web.